🔍Overview

Module 12 is the end of the course! In this module, you will read about the final steps you need to complete to finish the course. Please pay close attention to dates and deadlines, as they are extremely important.

The Module 12 video gives you a lighthearted look at where you are in the course. Feel free to contact us with any questions.

Activities in this module are due by Aug 18th (at or before 11:59pm Eastern Time). Please be aware that grades are due to the registrar so extensions are not possible in Module 12.

💎Shinies

Why be aware of deadlines?

While your portfolio will be going through final grading this week, it is not the end! If you are NOT happy with your grade and want to make changes that will increase your grade, you may do that. However, we have to submit grades to the registrar on time, so it is imperative that you know when the deadlines are.

Why SIRS/course evaluation?

We have gone on (and on!) about the importance of feedback throughout this course and take this belief to heart for ourselves, too! We are continually trying to improve this course to make it the ever-changing best course it can be. Your input matters a great deal to us in our continual improvement, so please do tell us what is going well and what we could consider changing to make it a better experience for future students.

We want you!

UncleSam Now that you’re wrapping up this course and your master’s program, maybe it’s time to think about further study at the doctoral level.

Are you a teacher or educational professional who has often thought about advanced study but has been unable to figure out how to reconcile work with further graduate study? If this applies to you, then consider the Hybrid Ph.D. program in Educational Technology here at Michigan State University. This program was created with practitioners like you specifically in mind. Moreover, it seeks to bring together people who care strongly about education and learning and who understand that newer technologies are fundamentally changing everything. We are looking for people who see the problems we face today and are interested in finding research driven solutions.

We are looking for the adventurous ones, the risk-takers, the ones who want to make a difference. And we want to bring them together using the powerful tools we now have to create, explore and share, to engage in dialogue and dissent, to critique and conduct research, and to experiment with new technologies, new pedagogies, and new content.

So if you are interesting in becoming part of the Hybrid Ph.D. program in educational technology and pursue deeper educational questions, visit http://edtechphd.com/ to learn more.

If you’re ready to take the next step from master’s to a doctoral degree, we want you to study with us!

🔗Mission 1

picture of binoculars

Overview: Preparing for the end of the semester

This page walks you through the steps you need to take to complete the course.

End of Exhibition to Aug 11th: Work on changes

Work on changes to your portfolio, whether they were inspired by a comment from the exhibition, from your buddy check, or by something you thought of weeks ago but haven’t had time to implement. Finish up pages from earlier assignments or include some of the optional module work you’ve been wanting to add. Be sure to finish your Powerups, too. Your instructors will begin grading portfolios on the morning of August 12th.

“The pile”

The exhibitions you completed in Module 11 were spread out over a number of days, and some of you were at different places in your portfolio progression even before going into your exhibition. The combination of these two things means that you might be a little bit ahead of or behind your classmates with getting your portfolios ready for final grading. With that in mind, we encourage you to let us know if you’d like to be at the top or the bottom of “the pile”:

Top of the pile: If you were in one of the first exhibitions or didn’t have much to change after your exhibition, you may be ready well before the official start date of our final grading. If this applies to you, please let us know! When portfolios are submitted early, we can get them graded and back to you earlier, which lets you wrap up your semester quickly and have a few extra days to relax. It also makes sure that we can spread out our grading over enough time to give personalized and detailed attention to everyone’s work.

Bottom of the pile: If you were in one of the last exhibitions, or your exhibition helped you realize a lot of things that you wanted to change, you might want a little extra time to work on your portfolio. If this applies to you, please let us know! We’ll set your portfolio aside until all the others have been graded. How much extra time this gives you will depend on a few other things, so we can’t guarantee much, but we can give you a little extra breathing room.

On or before Aug 14th: Receive feedback

You will receive feedback from your instructors. This will include:

  • Your preliminary final grade
  • Feedback and comments about your portfolio
  • Any changes you might make to change your grade

Aug 15th – Aug 18th: Revisions

You will fit into one of two categories at this point:

  • You are happy with your grade. If this is you, you have no more revisions to make now. We hope that you choose to keep this website active, but certainly understand the need for a break!
  • You want to make revisions for a higher grade. If this is you, please revise based on the feedback you have been given.
  • Whichever category you fit into, we ask that you email us before the end of the day on August 18th (or sooner if possible!) to detail the changes that you’ve made or to let us know that we shouldn’t be expecting any changes. Then, as necessary, we will re-assess your portfolio and adjust your grade accordingly!

🔗Mission 2

Complete your course evaluations

We’re almost done with the course, but there is still one very important thing you can do for us, your instructors. Course evaluations are important in part because they figure into the annual review process of University faculty and teaching assistants. But more importantly, they help improve the course and our craft as teachers.

  • CEP807 students only – The university will send you a link to their online course evaluations sometime soon. You do not have to do anything here in the course, but please do opt-in and fill out the online University SIRS which will be sent to you.
  • ED870 students only – Fill out the course evaluation (SIRS) anonymously using this link.

Thanks for doing this important part of the course!

📊Grades

As your instructors grade your portfolio, here is a reminder of what use as criteria to grade. We encourage you to use this list, too, as you make your final changes.

Design Standards of Excellence

  • Readability: Is the text on your website consistent and easy to read?
  • Color and Contrast: Does your choice of colors make the website easy to read?
  • Navigation: Are your links logical, consistent, and effective?
  • Multimedia: Do you appropriately integrate the images, sound, and video you use with the rest of your website?
  • Attribution: Do you provide correct attribution for the images, videos, and other resources you use?

Common issues

  • The titles of drop-down menus are often also links and should lead somewhere, not just to a blank page!
  • Make sure that you’ve carefully considered the privacy implications of including pictures of your children or students.
  • Linking back to the original source is necessary but not sufficient for a proper attribution.

Goal Reflection Essay Standards of Excellence

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Quality of Multimedia: Do you use text accurately and effectively? If you use images and other media, do you also use them accurately and effectively?
  • Identification of Original Goals: Does your essay identify and describe the goals you included in your program application?
  • Reflection on Changes in Original Goals: Does your essay clearly explain how and why your original goals have changed or stayed the same?
  • Word Length: Is your essay about 500 words?

Common issues

  • Do not write a revised goal statement.
  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym (like MAET or MAED) the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • We have no doubt that you’ve made a lot of changes over the course of your program, and we’d love to hear about all of them, but we’re specifically interested in your goals and how they have changed.
  • Think about adding a link to a PDF copy on this page so that viewers have the opportunity to read your essay in an alternative format (and this makes for easier printing if someone wanted to print your essay).

Resumé Standards of Excellence

  • Adaptation to Web: Is your resumé concise, and does it take advantages of the affordances of the Internet? (Remember, you can have more detail and traditional formatting on a PDF version. Make sure you are using the opportunities afforded by presenting it online, too.)
  • Formatting consistency: Do you use bullet points, headers, language, and other features effectively and consistently?
  • Text consistency: Do you use spelling, grammar, word choice (including acronyms), and punctuation correctly?
  • Resumé organization: Is your resumé effectively organized and in a logical order?
  • Availability and accessibility: Is your resumé available and accessible? This may include adding a downloadable version (such as a PDF) or providing access to your resumé in other formats (such as a Google Doc). Whatever option you choose, is the format functioning properly, integrated nicely with your design, and usable by readers?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Consider moving the link to your downloadable resumé to the top of the page. It’s more likely to be noticed that way.
  • Please also note that our intent with this Mission is not to have you duplicate your full, downloadable resumé on your portfolio page. Avoid complete replication by focusing on the highlights.
  • Consider not including personal information like phone numbers or addresses (for you or your references).
  • Please do not distribute the printable version of your resumé as a Word doc; a PDF is much more accessible (and less likely to have virus-related problems!)

Showcase Standards of Excellence

  • Compelling Introduction: Does the introduction to your showcase explain its purpose and organization?
  • Compelling Argument for Mastery: Do the categories and artifact descriptions in your showcase emphasize your professional skills outside the master’s program?
  • Organization: Are the elements of your showcase in a logical order, and are they effectively organized on the page?
  • Multimedia: Do you effectively use text, images, links, and other webpage elements to make an argument with your showcase?
  • Completion: Does your showcase include at least 8 artifacts?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • We know that all of these artifacts come from class assignments, but we suggest avoiding talking about the artifacts that way. Using language like “Our professor required us to” or “For this assignment, we had to” makes you look like a dutiful student but doesn’t enhance your professional credibility. Consider using phrases like “In this slideshow, I…” and “I created this video in order to…”
  • We have found that one effective way to organize artifacts in the showcase is to use of a number of categories that represent the areas of specific focus within the more general focus of your showcase.
  • Remember that the emphasis of the showcase is on individual artifacts, not on individual courses. Please do your best to make it easy for your visitors to see where one artifact stops and another one starts!

Future as a Learner Essay Standards of Excellence

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Introductory Paragraphs: Do the introductory paragraphs outline future goals and plans and the criteria, guidelines, or strategies used to determine the areas of focus for the essay?
  • Compelling Narrative: Does the essay tell a coherent and compelling story about the knowledge you need to excel in the future? Does it effectively use text (and possibly other media) to do so?
  • Topics and Resources: Do you include three distinct topics with fully-functioning links to corresponding resources?
  • Word Count: Is your essay about 750 words?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Think about adding an “advance organizer”— a sentence or two to introduce and summarize these goals—before writing about them in more detail.
  • Your goals are your own, but they fit into a larger context—try to relate these goals to the school where you teach or the world that you live in.

Annotated Transcript Standards of Excellence

  • Layout and Organization: Are the layout, organization, and (if included) multimedia of your transcript page engaging and effective?
  • Semesters and Years: Does your transcript include the semester and year that each course was taken?
  • Course Titles and Numbers: Does your transcript include course titles in all entries?
  • Course Instructors: Does your transcript include (correct) names and titles for instructors in all classes?
  • Course Descriptions: Does your transcript include course descriptions that are of the appropriate length (4-6 sentences) and quality?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Ideally, you’ll know who’s a “Dr.” and who isn’t and what everyone’s first name is. However, while it’s less ideal, simply being consistent (e.g. no “Dr.’s” or first names altogether) is better than being incorrect.
  • Because of the focus of this page, we strongly recommended not adding any work samples or links to work samples on this page. We suggest that you add these and other work samples to your showcase.

Synthesis Essay Standards of Excellence

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Quality of Multimedia: Do you use text accurately and effectively? If you use images and other media, do you also use them accurately and effectively?
  • Discussion of Individual Courses: Does your essay discuss in detail how at least three courses affected your thinking and practice?
  • Synthesis of Master’s Program Experience: Does your essay discuss how the master’s program as a whole affected your thinking and practice?
  • Word Length: Is your essay about 2,000 words?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Make sure to include some insights from both your individual classes and the program as a whole.