We use the following point distribution and grading criteria when evaluating your portfolios at the mid-point and end of the semester:

Design – 5 points

A portfolio earns all 5 points for design if it meets the following criteria:

  • Readability: Is the text on your website consistent and easy to read?
  • Color and Contrast: Does your choice of colors make the website easy to read?
  • Navigation: Are your links logical, consistent, and effective?
  • Multimedia: Do you appropriately integrate the images, sound, and video you use with the rest of your website?
  • Attribution: Do you provide correct attribution for the images, videos, and other resources you use?

Common issues

  • The titles of drop-down menus are often also links and should lead somewhere, not just to a blank page!
  • Make sure that you’ve carefully considered the privacy implications of including pictures of your children or students.
  • Linking back to the original source is necessary but not sufficient for a proper attribution.

Goal Reflection Essay – 5 points

A goal reflection essay earns all 5 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Quality of Multimedia: Do you use text accurately and effectively? If you use images and other media, do you also use them accurately and effectively?
  • Identification of Original Goals: Does your essay identify and describe the goals you included in your program application?
  • Reflection on Changes in Original Goals: Does your essay clearly explain how and why your original goals have changed or stayed the same?
  • Word Length: Is your essay about 500 words?

Common issues

  • Do not write a revised goal statement.
  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym (like MAET or MAED) the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • We have no doubt that you’ve made a lot of changes over the course of your program, and we’d love to hear about all of them, but we’re specifically interested in your goals and how they have changed.
  • Think about adding a link to a PDF copy on this page so that viewers have the opportunity to read your essay in an alternative format (and this makes for easier printing if someone wanted to print your essay).

Resumé – 5 points

A resumé earns all 5 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Adaptation to Web: Is your resumé concise, and does it take advantages of the affordances of the Internet? (Remember, you can have more detail and traditional formatting on a PDF version. Make sure you are using the opportunities afforded by presenting it online, too.)
  • Formatting consistency: Do you use bullet points, headers, language, and other features effectively and consistently?
  • Text consistency: Do you use spelling, grammar, word choice (including acronyms), and punctuation correctly?
  • Resumé organization: Is your resumé effectively organized and in a logical order?
  • Availability and accessibility: Is your resumé available and accessible? This may include adding a downloadable version (such as a PDF) or providing access to your resumé in other formats (such as a Google Doc). Whatever option you choose, is the format functioning properly, integrated nicely with your design, and usable by readers?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Consider moving the link to your downloadable resumé to the top of the page. It’s more likely to be noticed that way.
  • Please also note that our intent with this Mission is not to have you duplicate your full, downloadable resumé on your portfolio page. Avoid complete replication by focusing on the highlights.
  • Consider not including personal information like phone numbers or addresses (for you or your references).
  • Please do not distribute the printable version of your resumé as a Word doc; a PDF is much more accessible (and less likely to have virus-related problems!)

Showcase – 15 points

A showcase earns all 15 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Compelling Introduction: Does the introduction to your showcase explain its purpose and organization?
  • Compelling Argument for Mastery: Do the categories and artifact descriptions in your showcase emphasize your professional skills outside the master’s program?
  • Organization: Are the elements of your showcase in a logical order, and are they effectively organized on the page?
  • Multimedia: Do you effectively use text, images, links, and other webpage elements to make an argument with your showcase?
  • Completion: Does your showcase include at least 8 artifacts?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • We know that all of these artifacts come from class assignments, but we suggest avoiding talking about the artifacts that way. Using language like “Our professor required us to” or “For this assignment, we had to” makes you look like a dutiful student but doesn’t enhance your professional credibility. Consider using phrases like “In this slideshow, I…” and “I created this video in order to…”
  • We have found that one effective way to organize artifacts in the showcase is to use of a number of categories that represent the areas of specific focus within the more general focus of your showcase.
  • Remember that the emphasis of the showcase is on individual artifacts, not on individual courses. Please do your best to make it easy for your visitors to see where one artifact stops and another one starts!

Future Learning Goals Essay – 5 points

A future learning goals essay earns all 5 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Introductory Paragraphs: Do the introductory paragraphs outline future goals and plans and the criteria, guidelines, or strategies used to determine the areas of focus for the essay?
  • Compelling Narrative: Does the essay tell a coherent and compelling story about the knowledge you need to excel in the future? Does it effectively use text (and possibly other media) to do so?
  • Topics and Resources: Do you include three distinct topics with fully-functioning links to corresponding resources?
  • Word Count: Is your essay about 750 words?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Think about adding an “advance organizer”— a sentence or two to introduce and summarize these goals—before writing about them in more detail.
  • Your goals are your own, but they fit into a larger context—try to relate these goals to the school where you teach or the world that you live in.

Annotated Transcript – 10 points

An annotated transcript earns all 10 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Layout and Organization: Are the layout, organization, and (if included) multimedia of your transcript page engaging and effective?
  • Semesters and Years: Does your transcript include the semester and year that each course was taken?
  • Course Titles and Numbers: Does your transcript include course titles in all entries?
  • Course Instructors: Does your transcript include (correct) names and titles for instructors in all classes?
  • Course Descriptions: Does your transcript include course descriptions that are of the appropriate length (4-6 sentences) and quality?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Ideally, you’ll know who’s a “Dr.” and who isn’t and what everyone’s first name is. However, while it’s less ideal, simply being consistent (e.g. no “Dr.’s” or first names altogether) is better than being incorrect.
  • Because of the focus of this page, we strongly recommended not adding any work samples or links to work samples on this page. We suggest that you add these and other work samples to your showcase.

Synthesis Essay – 21 points

A synthesis essay earns all 21 points if it meets the following criteria:

  • Title: Does your essay have an expressive title?
  • Quality of Multimedia: Do you use text accurately and effectively? If you use images and other media, do you also use them accurately and effectively?
  • Discussion of Individual Courses: Does your essay discuss in detail how at least three courses affected your thinking and practice?
  • Synthesis of Master’s Program Experience: Does your essay discuss how the master’s program as a whole affected your thinking and practice?
  • Word Length: Is your essay about 2,000 words?

Common issues

  • Remember that people outside your program or workplace might not understand all the terms and acronyms you use. It’s always a good idea to “spell out” an acronym the first time you use it, and you should also consider defining terms that aren’t commonly used.
  • Make sure to include some insights from both your individual classes and the program as a whole.