Week 3 Activities

Week 3 continues our introduction to cognitive perspectives on learning and also extends our consideration of what causes major changes in the way that we think about things, especially in terms of the building and testing of theory.

Week 3 also includes two learning activities: (a) an audio interview project focusing on what motivates learners, and (b) the controversy about whether technology is making us more connected to each other. Both of these activities will last two weeks, with part 1 being completed this week, and part 2 being completed next week.

Activities / Checklist

Base Group Check-in

Similar to the way we started each day of our face-to-face class sessions, we will start each week of the online portion of the course by checking in with your Base Group. For this week, please answer the following questions:

  1. How does it feel to begin the online portion of the course? Any concerns? Anything you are looking forward to?
  2. This week focuses, in part, on the complex cognitive processes that lead to “understanding,” where understanding involves “appropriately transforming and using knowledge, skills, and ideas (Woolfolk, 2007, p. 285). A concrete example of such ‘complex cognitive processes’ includes the learning skills and study strategies needed to be successful in school. As you start your 3rd week in the doctoral program, what learning strategies and study skills do you think you will need to earn your PhD? In what ways has your thinking about these strategies and skills changed since beginning the program?
Understanding Motivation
Part 1
What motivates people to learn?

Similar to our ‘selling behaviorism’ project, during weeks 3 and 4 we are going to use technology to develop a deeper understanding of what motivates people to learn.

Specifically, using the audio technology of your choice, your assignment is to interview participants, document what motivates them to learn, and present your findings.

The timing and deadlines are follows:

  • By Wed night of this week: choose your technologies (e.g., microphones, audio recording software like Audacity.
  • By Saturday night of this week: choose your topic and develop interview questions and a protocol. Be forewarned, this step is not as easy as it sounds!
  • By Wed night of next week: find 1 – 2 participants and conduct your interview(s).
  • By Saturday night of next week: Edit your interview, pulling out what you consider to be major themes about what motivates people to learn. Your final 3-5 minute audio presentation should report these themes and highlight corresponding evidence from your interview(s). Said differently: your final audio should do more than simply re-play your interview. Your final audio should report ‘your understanding of your participants’ understanding’ about what motivates them to learn.

Additional information about the Understanding Motivation activity is available here.

Controversy
Part 1
ISSUE: Is technology making us more connected to one another?

Similar to our face-to-face approach, we are going to to do a constructive controversy. The two key differences are that this one (a) will span two weeks and (b) will be conducted online.

The timing and deadlines are follows.:

  • By Wed night of this week, you must have completed steps #1 and #2 with your partner.
  • By Saturday night of this week, you must have completed step #3.
  • By Wed night of next week, you must have completed step #4.
  • By Saturday night of next week, you must have completed step #5.

To work on the controversy, and see the numbered steps. Select Controversy Number 3 from the “Controversy” Tab at the top of this page. Click “Work on It”.

Read, Process, Post, & Discuss
Part 1
  • Woolfolk, A. (2007). Chapter 8 – Complex cognitive processes. Educational psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Woolfolk, A. (2007). Chapter 9 – Social, cognitive, and constructivist views. Educational psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Resta, P., & Laferriere, T. (2007). Technology in support of collaborative learning. Educational Psychology Review, 19, 65-83.

Click when you’re ready to post and discuss these readings

Read, Process, Post, & Discuss
Part 2
  • Derry, G. N. (2002). Close but no cigar: Discrepancies as a key to discovery. In What Science is and How it Works (pp. 42-51). Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ Press.
  • Derry, G. N. (2002). Ingredients for a revolution: Thematic imagination, precise measurements, and the motions of the planets. In What Science is and How it Works (pp. 52-65). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Click when you’re ready to post and discuss these two readings

RDP

(more information)

Begin to identify articles, book chapters, and books in your area of interest. Find these materials and read them.
Annotation of Articles

(more information)

To be done by Wed by Base Group #3. Post a summary as the first entry in the discussion. Your entry can be the summary itself, or a link to a summary hosted somewhere else.
Base Group Checkout

As in the face-to-face class sessions, we will also complete each week of the online portion of the course by checking out with your Base Group. Please answer the following questions:

  1. Having just completed the first week of the online portion of the course, how did it go for you? Any surprises?
  2. Have you developed any new strategies to help you manage the online coursework?

Deadlines

Unless stated otherwise, deadlines for each week are Saturday at 11:59 PM. Base Group Check-ins are due on Wednesday at 11:59 PM. Base Group checkouts are due Saturday at 11:59 PM. All Read, Process, Post, & Discuss activities have two parts: (1) Your own response to the questions associated with the readings are due on Saturday at 11:59 PM; and (2) Your response to at least TWO classmates’ postings are due on the following Wednesday at 11:59 PM. All times are EDT.

2 Comments »

  • Lawrence said:

    May I offer a quick tool plug? Okay. Thanks for allowing me the opportunity…

    Google Voice is a service that provides a little control over your phone use and especially your voicemail – kinda neat really. I am not suggesting you sign up or this service or recommending it, but for those of you that do utilize it, Voice allows you to make calls and record them. This call will inform the other end that you’re recording and when finished, you can download that audio file as an MP3 so any interview you’d like to do over the phone can be recorded in a very useable format. Note: This feature is available in the “upgraded” version (still free!) of Google Voice. Just a thought to those of you who are using it already, or have been intrigued to try it.

  • karen bedell
    karen bedell said:

    Thanks for the advice, Lawrence. Can always use it!

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