Week 4 Activities

In Week 4 we introduce motivational perspectives on learning, both from a cognitive and social-ecological viewpoints. We will also consider the role of educational games, a hot topic currently in terms of technology’s role in academic motivation. In the Derry readings, we consider the strengths and limitations of quantitative approaches to science. The Derry readings also foreshadow next week’s consideration of qualitative approaches.

It’s a busy week. In week 4 you will complete an article critique, and will finish our two learning activities: (a) the audio interview project focusing on what motivates learners, and (b) the controversy about whether technology is making us more connected to each other. Work hard and enjoy!

Activities / Checklist

Base Group Check-in

For this week, please answer the following questions:

  1. What activities do you engage in frequently because you enjoy them? What makes these activities so enjoyable? What do you get out of them?
  2. What activities do you engage in frequently even though you don’t enjoy them (e.g., because they are responsibilities that you can’t evade or because you view them as necessary steps toward some important goal)? How do you motivate yourself to engage in these “unenjoyed” activities? How do you motivate yourself to do them well, or at least well enough?
Understanding Motivation
Part 2
What motivates people to learn? – Part 2

In Part 2 of our ‘Understanding Motivation’ project you will use technology to to create an audio experience for your listeners. After all, high-quality audio does not just report what someone says. High-quality, well-produced audio also sets a tone, induces mood, and so doing creates situational interest.

By now, you should have chosen your topic and developed your interview questions and protocol. The timing and deadlines for this week are as follows:

  • By Wed night: find 1 – 2 participants and conduct your interview(s).
  • By Saturday night: Edit your interview, pulling out what you consider to be major themes about what motivates people to learn. Your final 3-5 minute audio presentation should report these themes and highlight corresponding evidence from your interview(s). Said differently: your final audio should do more than simply re-play your interview. Your final audio should report ‘your understanding of your participants’ understanding’ about what motivates them to learn.

Additional information about the Understanding Motivation activity is available here.

Controversy
Part 2
ISSUE: Is technology making us more connected to one another?
Similar to our face-to-face approach, we are going to to do a constructive controversy. The two key differences are that this one (a) will span two weeks and (b) will be conducted online.

The timing and deadlines are follows.:

  • By Wed night of this week, you must have completed step #4.
  • By Saturday night of this week, you must have completed step #5.

To work on the controversy, and see the numbered steps. Select Controversy Number 3 from the “Controversy” Tab at the top of this page. Click “Work on It”.

Read, Process, Post, & Discuss
Part 1
For those with Woolfolk’s 10th edition, read chapter 10 only:

  • Woolfolk, A. (2007). Motivation in learning and teaching. In Educational Psychology (10th., pp. 370-411). Columbus, OH: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

For those with Woolfolk’s 11th edition, please read chapters 10 and 11. Please note that, at this time, we only have pdf copies for the 10th edition.

  • Woolfolk, A. (2010). Social cognitive views of motivation and learning. In Educational Psychology (11th ed, pp. 370-411). Columbus, OH: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.
  • Woolfolk, A. (2010). Motivation in learning and teaching. In Educational Psychology (11th ed., pp. 412- ??). Columbus, OH: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

Everyone should read the following:

  • Gee, J. P. (2007). Learning and games. In K. Salen, The Ecology of Games: Connecfting Youth, Games, and Learning (pp. 21-40). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. doi: 10.1162/dmal.9780262693646.021.
  • Click when you’re ready to post and discuss these readings

    Read, Process, Post, & Discuss
    Part 2
    • Derry, G. N. (2002). The numbers game: Uses of quantitative reasoning. In What Science is and How it Works (pp. 107-122). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
    • Derry, G. N. (2002). The straight and narrow: Linear dependence in science. In What Science is and How it Works (pp. 274-284). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
    • Derry, G. N. (2002). The limits of the possible: Exponential Growth and Decay. In What Science is and How it Works. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Click when you’re ready to post and discuss these readings

    RDP

    (more information)

    To stay on schedule, during Week 4 we recommend that you try to complete your annotated bibliography of at least 6 relevant sources.

    Note, however, that you won’t turn anything in until Week 5. With several other things due during Week 4, we want you to have some flexibility on when you choose to complete the RDP annotations.

    Article Critique

    (more information)

    Your second Article Critique is due on Saturday, 11:59 PM.

    • This is an individual assignment.
    • Use these questions to review this article.
    • Post your critique on your own web presence, as this is one of the required turn-ins for your first year prelim
    • Make sure the “website” field of your profile on this site has the correct URL for your web presence.
    • If your website is not ready yet, email your critique to both faculty instructors
    Annotation of Articles

    (more information)

    To be done by Wed by Base Group #4. Post a summary as the first entry in the discussion. Your entry can be the summary itself, or a link to a summary hosted somewhere else.
    Base Group Checkout

    Please checkout with your Base Group by answering the following questions:

    1. Looking back at the Week 4 readings, what are 3 things you learned about motivation that you would want every teacher to know?
    2. Finishing Week 4 also means that we are beyond the half-way point in the semester. How are things going for you? Are you going to make it? Is there anything you hope to do differently during the remaining weeks?

    Deadlines

    Unless stated otherwise, deadlines for each week are Saturday at 11:59 PM. Base Group Check-ins are due on Wednesday at 11:59 PM. Base Group checkouts are due Saturday at 11:59 PM. All Read, Process, Post, & Discuss activities have two parts: (1) Your own response to the questions associated with the readings are due on Saturday at 11:59 PM; and (2) Your response to at least TWO classmates’ postings are due on the following Wednesday at 11:59 PM. All times are EDT.

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